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the knife ban isn't worth the risk. this change takes effect on april 25th. >>> a winter storm dumps more than a foot of snow in colorado. driving has been made dangerous on major interstates, canceled more than 40 flights in denver. along the continental divide, crews shot artillery shells into the side of a mountain to start a controlled avalanche to prevent a more dangerous natural one. demolitions are under way along the massachusetts coast after a late winter storm knocked at least three homes off their foundations and pushed them into the atlantic. the storm left a dozen homes on plum island uninhabitable. residents there long have fought coastal erosion and say the federal jetty system is making the problem worse. >>> did you remember to set your clocks ahead before going to bed last night? i certainly worried about it because i had to get up real early. if you haven't, it's all right. just know you're an hour behind this morning. daylight saving time began at 2:00 a.m. i know it's hard to lose that extra hour of sleep. what i keep telling myself, the bright side, we're gaining mor
of both the expanding economy and schedule changes in rules. a comparison average of about 18% over the past 40 years. at the same time, if current laws remain in place, federal spending will fall relative to the size of the economy and then rise again. the decline can be traced to be discretionary funding. and to a drop off that sense to go up when the economy is weak. -- that tend to go up when the economy is weak.but later in the decade, spending turns up again . part of this is the return of interest rates to more normal levels and our projection that would push up interest payments to nearly their highest share of gdp in did years. another of the decade a significant expansion of federal health-care programs and rising health-care costs per person will push up spending on the largest federal programs, social security, medicare, medicaid. by 2020.-- by 2023, it reaches 23% a g.d.p. what does this mean for federal debt that we expect that will reach 76% of gdp this year, at the highest since 1950. we protect it will be higher than the 39% average. it will be rising again as part
with the bartender who changed political history. tonight, the footage you haven't seen including the heroic act that convinced scott prody he needed to release the tape. >> looking back on it, it's one of the proudest moments of my life. >>> they're refighting the vietnam war over at cpac. >> vietnam was winnable, but people in washington decided we would not win it. >>> howard fineman has a wrap-up of the conservative conclave. >>> plus more republican obstruction of appointees has democrats fuming. i'll ask former senator tom daschle if harry reid needs to revisit the filibuster reform. >>> and yesterday it was the president. now democratic leadership looks like they may cave on social security. i'll ask the big congressional panel where they stand. >>> good to have you with us, folks, thanks for watching. people around the country are still buzzing about the man behind the 47% video who revealed his identity on this show last night. now, today the world is getting to know the real scott prody. he described himself on this program as a regular guy. he's got bills to pay, he struggles in the m
're not talking about secular model of reform meaning changes to church teaching on matters such as abortion or birth control. instead they're talking about changes in business management in the vatican towards making the bureaucracy here more transparent, that is both internally and externally, making it clearer who's making decisions and why and also doing a better job communicating with the outside world towards making it more accountable. that is the idea that there ought to be penalties for poor performance and towards making it efficient. the notion being is that there thinking in centuries may have cut it once upon a while but in a 21st century world it simply doesn't do it anymore. that's what these cardinals mean by reform and they have embraced pope francis tasman who can deliver it. whether it plays out in practice that way, of course, remains to be seen. >> brown: is there an expectation that on one key matter the sexual abuse scandals that he has to do something fairly quickly,? whether it's make a gesture or take action? >> well, i think it's very clear to anyone who's been pay
't planning immediate changes. the complex includes a movie authority to and bed bath and beyond. >>> samsung unveiled its latest phone, the galaxy s4. it is slimmer and lighter than the s3. and has a 5-inch high definition screen. the galaxy galaxy s4 can stop and start videos based on whether someone is looking at the screen. all service providers will be selling the phone. >>> california water officials released the first part of the sacramento-san joaquin delta plan. it would protect the ecosystem and guarantee a stable water supply. a tunnel project it will carry water south to cities and farms. other parts will be released next month. >>> another nice day in the bay area. >> another warm day. clouds earlier. you see a few high clouds but temperatures today in the 70s. plenty of mid-70s. lots of clouds now. the clouds are in response to a weak weather system. and the fog in response to that as well. temperatures cooled in some areas today. it was cooler than yesterday. i don't see 80s out there. official numbers we will have 80s. right now we got fog here. and then this other stuff -- th
brother john died of aids. marie howe, who said, "john's living and dying changed my aesthetic entirely." >> the gate. i had no idea that the gate i would step through to finally enter this world would be the space my brother's body made. he was a little taller than me: a young man but grown, himself by then, done at twenty-eight, having folded every sheet, rinsed every glass he would ever rinse under the cold and running water. this is what you have been waiting for, he used to say to me. and i'd say, what? and he'd say, this -- holding up my cheese and mustard sandwich. and i would say, what? and he would say, this, sort of lookinaround. >> production assistance for "inside washington" was provided by allbritton communications and politico, reporting on the legislative, executive, and political arena. it is march madness when it comes to seniors. >> this week on "inside washington," the budget dance continues. >> making sure we can live within our means. >> his poll numbers dropped but the president's charm offensive continues. >> i'm trying to create an atmosphere to get something do
and all of the thrashing in the world can't change that his vital functions have shutting down and he will cease to exist as a human being. greg? >> wow. that was thorough. >> it gets more involved each time. >> i would call it fan fiction, but it is more like anti-fan fiction. >> it is the opposite of slash fiction. >> do you though there is a police officer in new york arrested for writing such things. >> is that right? >> yes. >> well, that police officer is not me. >> that is true. >> i like the new set, by the way. >> it is permanent. it will be from now on, viewers at home. >> fantastic. >> go away. let's welcome our guest. she spends all of her time getting dangerous men off. i am here tonight with criminal defense attorney remi spencer. and he is so sharp he is not uh you loued near -- he is not allowed near -- he is not allowed near he mow fill yaks. in stockholm he is a syndrome, bill schulz. and i would stick my head inside of him for safety reasons he is the editor-in-chief. that's a copyright there. >> a block. the lede. and now the longest hour in television. >> must the
, as a three-term senator i'm wondering how much have you seen a change in d.c. since you left office? >> well, when i ran for office the first time in 1978, my primary and general election campaigns cost $26 million. jon corzine won in 2000 which was over a decade ago, spent $63 million. >> john: that was just the buffet. >> much of it his own. >> john: i guess citizens united united is assigned the culpability in this. but it seems like it was going on to a great -- >> oh, yeah, citizens united just turbocharged what was the problem. that $318 million i'm talking about from the finance industry didn't come because of citizens united. citizens united is super paced. these are institutions that make contributions through their own pacs and individuals and money and then visit a congressman or senator and talk about an issue. from my standpoint lobbyists are often very helpful. they bring information. you have to break the link between the lobbyist and money. and so let them off of their advice make their arguments but then an hour later, don't go down to the back room of the bar and get $10,00
, just tell whausz you want us to be. we'll change for you. just tell us what you want us to do. we'll do it. that's not a political party. that's just a bunch of pandering idiots. is that the nature of ryan priebus effort? we want everybody to vote republican but we don't want it to matter too much to them on abortion and gay rights and cultural values. we don't want those to get in the way. >> i don't think that's exactly what the report did. i honestly -- >> did it mention sany of this stuff? >> i think priebus did a pretty good job saying we have a problem. i think people are going to interpret the report the way they want. one of the things that i thought it was problematic, they never said, look, we we have "x" core values. there's a home for them in the republican party but they never re-established the core values. some of the things relative to the presidential primaries. built in were biases which help wealthy candidates and frankly hurt tee party candidates and libertarians and that's billed throughout the effort. i do think it was a good effort. i think it's just a start. >> i
garb, not in papal white but in simple priestley black. he changed later on. but in any case it was another sign of what we've been talking about all along, his humility. i took a closer look at the new pope in a story last night. >> translator: begin this journ journey. >> reporter: his journey began wednesday when cardinal jorge mario bergoglio of argentina was elected to lead the catholic church. he's the first non-european pope since the 8th century and first pope ever from south america. he will called pope francis, in honor of st. francis of assisi. bergoglio was born in 1936 in buenos aires, argentina. the son of an italian i'll grant, a railway worker. he had four brothers and sisters. he studied to brk a chemist before receiving the call to the priesthood. the 76-year-old was ordained a jesuit in december of 1969. and has served as orsh bishop of buenos aires. he was made a cardinal on february 21st, 2001. bergoglio is said to have been the runner-up in a 2005 concl e conclave. and in 2013 he was the oldest of the possible candidate, barely mentioned ad eed as a top
of that is going to change when gay couples are allowed to do the same. the fact is that throughout the nation's history, gay couples and gay individuals have been paying their taxes, and by paying our taxes, we help support all the legal benefits and protections of marriage. according to the government accountability office, there are over 01100 legal benefits and protections that are given to married couples. we have been subsidizing those throughout the nation's history. yet we are unable to take advantage of those same incentives to marry. that cannot be constitutional. host: let me ask you this. should the court be jumping in at this point? one of the arguments being made by the lawyers for proposition 8, today's oral argument, is that there is a social movement happening. polls are showing more people in favor. let that take place. let states decide what they want to do. is there a role for the supreme court? caller: of course there is. this cannot be accomplished in a piecemeal, state-by-state basis. most of the legal benefits of marriage come from the federal government. but me give yo
and in limbo. this must change. it is unfair. it is just not the american way and this country is ready for it. but i will agree with brian on this. no matter what, there's been so much momentum. no matter what happens with this, get california, that will be the tenth straight in the district of columbia with the marriage equality. 278 of america's largest corporations said it is bad for business to discriminate leading up to the court cases. we saw several senators from rockport, claire mccaskill to mark warner come out and say they're in support. the tide has turned. it is safe for even republicans to come out now. there's no going back so the court might as well take that step and do the right thing today. >> john: i'm glad you mentioned the corporations. we've learned in this age of supermergers, our politicians don't mind when corporations marry corporations, even polygamy. i want to talk about justice scalia's comments on children raised by same-sex couples. of course, he's against gay marriage traditionally because of his catholic background, a follower of jesus who was a noted nonhomop
into their 90's and that's a great thing. one thing that hasn't changed -- the official retirement age. the question is how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years? >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. some weeks demand more analysis than others. white house tours were canceled but it wasn't about that. republicans and democrats issued competing budget blueprints but it wasn't about that either. what it seemed to be about as self-definition, a sudden recognition that in the eyes of the american people they've been doing it all wrong, so the president went repeated by to capitol hill. >> over the last several weeks the press here in washington has been reporting about obama's charm offensive. all i've been doing is just calling up folks and trying to see if we can brea
. there is no nice way to tell seniors you're changing social security. to tell latinos we're profiling you, we're suppressing your vote. we don't need a smile. we need new policies. thank you for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> religious war. let's play "hardball." good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. i'm not washington. let me start tonight with this. you can't steer a car with the engine off. it's problem with the republican party today. get rid of the cultural right, abortion and gay marriage, all those began who moving to the republican party over prayer in public school years ago and you kill one giant engine. get rid of the whackos as john mccain cats them and you lose another engine. all the libertarians who just want government out of their face and out of their lives and you kell another engine. try to do what reince priebus is doing right now and you will see the problem, try steering the car with your engine dead. try steering the political party once you kill the motor. you set out to kill the big motors of the republican party itself. for pr
means there will be a change, a positive change coming out of this. this decision is actually made. >> fighting for my rights, for the lights of the community and i'm showing i care and that i want equal treatment under the law. >> while we may disagree with other clergy who feel differently we still stand with the couples and the families that are waiting for this day of justice to happen. >> reporter: as you can see people have been bringing rainbow flags, signs, wearing t- shirts, all in support of a reinstatement of gay marriage in the state of california. if not nationwide. i have been looking around the crowd in the area and i haven't seen anybody who is in support of proposition eight. of course that is the gay marriage ban but this is going to last until eight tonight. we will be here and we will bring you more live pictures coming up in the 6:00 news. reporting live. channel 2news. >> some cities in california are showing support for gays and lesbians during the two days of arguments. in long beach the gay flag is hanging at city
are just not compatible. we've made a lot of recommendations about what, changing the culture. that was left for nasa to do at their own pace. ra remain committed that they are just as important as the return to flight recommendations and as a matter of principle for the future of designing any spacecraft that the principles are applicable this you cannot allow the guy that is responsible for the scheduled cost and payload to trade engineering safety insurance you just cannot run a risky enterprise not just shovels that anybody so that's all i'm going to say. that is kind of up in the clouds of where we were and then we shredded it down to writing specifics so people could understand and take actions on. we don't want to write something that was so generic you can use it. but we had overarching philosophical viewpoint that for example the management of the space shuttle program was so inappropriate that if you didn't lose the shuttle next week he would lose it next month. the program was incapable of managing a risky enterprise and so then we shredded it down to other things.
conservative. in a cnn exclusive, senator rob portman explains the personal reasons behind his change of heart. >>> and a bizarre and tragic medical mystery. a man dies after receiving a transplanted kidney tainted with rabies. how could this happen in the united states of america? how many other people are at risk right now? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." forget all those wacky scenes of north korea's leader joking around with dennis rodman. the united states, the obama administration, right now taking the north's threats of a nuclear attack very seriously. the pentagon has just announced it will beef up america's defense missile systems out on the west coast. in california, oregon, washington state. let's go straight to cnn's pentagon correspondent chris lawrence, watching what's going on. chris, a lot of us are stunned by this decision but update us on what is going on. >> wolf, we just came out of a briefing where we learned the pentagon is going to spend a billion dollars to put new intercepter missiles on the west coast. now, that plan includes react investigating a mi
biography of rachael jackson. understand the amount of change that kantor jackson brought to washington. >> -- andrew jackson brought to washington. >> he is the first westerner. we have va. presidents before that. jackson is somebody completely different. he grew up in the frontier. the change is enormous. socially, the change is enormous. --n though he is a planter, he was not like a new england int -- new englanders island -- either. he brought very different values and very different ambitions. >> even though he was awaited -- would president. >> she was the one of his life. a few months, at before he went to be inaugurated, and he was bereft. he spent all of his time thinking about her and her memory and having her pictures, portraits in the bedroom. it really changed. >> we need to delve into the campaign of 1828 to understand the presidency. -- how did itr of change? >> it was the first time we did not have the majority of electors. the election was given over to the house of representatives. he'll have these multiple competing factions in the house of representatives. you have c
of politics. let's talk in a broad sense about the changing country and the changing political parties. >> one of the major things that we forget, because we're so comfortable with the united states being a two-party system and that being what democracy is or at least is here, we forget that during the early republic, there wasn't a two- party system, that the founding fathers hated parties and thought they would be terrible for democracy. there was this generation, particularly martin van buren who said we need to have an ordered, structured system, of making political things happen and that's the parties. we have to have a philosophy. we have to show up together and vote on the same thing and we have to hang together, or these sections of the country or these differences in the democracy will spin out of control, and actually they did. >> how did washington, d.c. change over these 12 years? >> it grew like crazy. at the beginning, of course, it was basically just kind of a big -- with trees and dirt and then there would be a house and a building there. then it became actually a city and it b
to do more and do it faster to change the way medicare and medicaid pay for healthcare. how to boost the country's economy, we learned from economists the number one way to reduce healthcare spending is to end fee-for-service. everyone agree that fee-for-service drives volumes, excesses, and waste. we know this encourages the wrong things. that's why healthcare reform changed incentives to providers. and medicare and medicaid are testing different programs to determine which work best. in october, medicare rolled out a program with a simple yet revolutionary premise. medicare is going to pay hospitals to get the job done right the first time. the hospitals are penalized if patients are readmitted too soon after being discharged. communities from montana to maryland are rising to the challenge. in miss sue los angeles montana, the local earth is partnering with medicare on care transitions. under the program, patients at reaction of readmission will get extra help making the transmission from the hospital back to the community. today we'll hear about data showing significant first ste
not sense that there's going to be major changes. he does seem like a very humble guy. he seems like a guy with a very good sense of humor. i certainly got that sense from him even in his massive outpouring last night in his first public appearance as pope. but this is not somebody is going to embrace gay marriage or adoption by gay parents or female priests even conception, that was an issue for him in argentina. so i don't think we're going to see major doctrinal changes like that out of this pope. although he will probably it seems at least from his first day in the position so far he's going to re-focus the position of the church at least on issues of the poor. >> yeah. and i want to bring in john allen. miguel, standby. we said this mass is underway and want to give people a sense of the flavor, the atmosphere. let's listen for a moment. ♪ miguel marquez and john allen standing by there in vatican city. i understand john's having trouble hearing us so i'll put this question to you, miguel. these days the pope really needs to be part saint and part mba to operate as a successful pont
, can pope francis effect change. he's talking to the people. he's kissing babies. he's affable. everybody loves him. at the end of the day the question is, can he really change anything within the catholic church? >> well, some of those things he simply cannot change, and that's because of doctrinal changes. some things he can put a focus on. for example, on saturday as he's meeting an audience, he mentioned saint frap sis as the patron of creation. nothing very good to creation have we. that got lost. if you're in creation, environment, ecology will not be lost on this pope. there are other issues in which he can emphasize main line catholic teachings. >> father beck, if you could weigh in on that as well. >> all of those issues you mentioned, women priest, certainly, would be the most unchanged. birth control, 1969, the end result of that was not to listen to a group that was at vatican recommending a change in the church position on that. this pope could have another conversation about birth control if he wanted to. married priesthood. that is a discipline in the catholic ch
a fundamental transformation, a systemic change, something we in central and eastern europe had to do 20 years ago, something similar. the other part of the problem is the european integration model, the excessive and unnatural centralization, harmonization, standardization, and unification of the european continent based on the concept of an ever-closer union is another obstacle. a few days ago i listened to the speech given by the italian minister of the economy, and he made a point that to build such an integration was a necessity. i raised my hand, and asked, what you mean, such an integration of the current form of european integration is an historical accident. it could have many developments, many of variants, and i am sure this one is the wrong one. these complex issues deserve to be discussed from many perspectives, but it is evident they found their climax in the attempt to monetary unify the whole continent. this was the moment, to use the ogy, when the marginal costs exceeded their benefits. this evidence failure -- and it is appropriate to call it a failure -- was inevitable, byec
and change whereas brent is so high and of course, our gasoline is priced up at brent because of the mismatch of the non-federal policy on energy and everywhere we don't need it. we don't have keystone yet and we can't get the refiners and they used to have the right oil and they're all for heavy oil. >> you mentioned two problems that require the federal government to have a response. an energy policy and an immigration policy. neither of which yet exists. >> no. 6:30 dinner is sacrosanct at the white house, and we know when we have congress people on they seem to want to spitball each other and throw mud. i don't see the consensus developing. everyone thinks the market can take care of itself. you can't. the cng, compressed natural gas, so the companies want gas, but they want the -- you can't do what's uponed without the federal government. not subsidies, but just law. >> let's switch gears here and talk about apple. jefferies is cutting its price target from $420 a share from $500 while maintaining a hold on it. asia channel checks have led him to cut revenues to the low end of current qu
of his offices, and residen resident-- residences have, they make his bed, they change his sheets, they set out his table settings. they're waiting for him to reappear any day. his notebook, his cigarettes, everything is there waiting. >> rose: cardinal dolan, the story of whitey bulger tina packer and lawrence wright when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: cardinal timothy dolan the archbishop in new york was in rome for the recent conclave that selected a new pope. i talked with him soon after the vote and dinner with the pope, among the 115 cardinals who selected him, and we talked about the selection of this new pope. >> what does this choice represent for the church, and why do you believe without telling us anything that went on inside, why dow believe he was chosen? >> well, let's look at it from two ways, charlie. first of all you asked me what does this represent, or what does this mean. let me try to answer that one in two w
it ability development -- capability development, a, have you seen any glimpse of possible change in the decision-making and will of the leadership that will decide whether or not they will comply in any sense at all with requests made by the global community, and b, are there concerns relative to the cooperation between north korea and iran relative to holistic missile technology and other aspects that might give iran -- modify the timetable for the ability to get this capability? >> for the first part of your question at the second part for the relationship between north korea and iran, that might be better addressed in closed session. clearly the sanctions have had profound impact on iran's economy. by any measure, whether it is inflation are unemployment availability, commodities, etc. that situation is getting worse. at the same time, these publicly, overtly change in iranian leadership, the supreme leader's approach, we can go into perhaps more detail our discussion in it closed -- in a close setting for some indications that might be of interest to you. i will let it go at
now. to me it means there will be a change, a positive change coming out of this. this decision is actually made. >> fighting for my rights, for the lights of the community and i'm showing i care and that i want equal treatment under the law. >> while we may disagree with other clergy who feel differently we still stand with the couples and the families that are waiting for this day of justice to happen. >> reporter: as you can see people have been bringing rainbow flags, signs, wearing t- shirts, all in support of a reinstatement of gay marriage in the state of california. if not nationwide. i have been looking around the crowd in the area and i haven't seen anybody who is in support of proposition eight. of course that is the gay marriage ban but this is going to last until eight tonight. we will be here and we will bring you more live pictures coming up in the 6:00 news. reporting live. channel 2news. >> some cities in california are showing support for gays and lesbians during the two days of arguments. in long beach the gay flag is hanging at city hall. the mayor there s
by death of a thousand cuts which will be opinion polls changing day after day after day, and marginalizing, slowly our opposition seeing state after state coming to the conclusion that it is unfair to treat couples differently just because of their sexual orientation, and it's not in the spirit of this country, which we don't get things right right away all the time, but we move in the right direction. >> john: it's great to see progress taking place in our time, and it came because lbgt americans and their allies got organized and forced the leaders to follow them. brian a lot of court watchers are saying that the liberal block and swing justice kennedy seem ready to strike the act down today? how important is it to get one of the conservative votes? >> i think it is possible, and it should be. because we're talking about a law that disrespects the decisions that states have already made about allowing same-sex couples to marry, and that seems like a rather conservative concept. >> john: exactly. >> it would be great to see one of them come alon
. >> reporter: epa says the gasoline change reducing sulphur by two-thirds would not go into effect for four years and would have the pollution impact of taking 30 million cars off the road. the agency says the change would cost about a penny per gallon. critics say it would be more li a dime. the epa says 29 of the nation's 111 refineries already meet the sulfur standard in only 16 would need major modifications. public citizen's think the industry is exaggerating the cost. >> this is kind of game that people play if you don't want t -mbark upon the required necessary investments in refining infrastructure you paint a doom and gloom scenario. >> reporter: officials say the changes would prevent tens of thousands of child respiratory ailments since a 2400 lives per year, but obama congressman wants proof of that. >> my child has as much. i get this. and the stand this, but you cannot just make a unilateral declaration and have some capricious new regulation come out that actually does not have the real effect other than just raising prices. >> reporter: automakers support the changes but oil
skeptical about this. because of some changes they decided not to change the age at which the medicare changes would begin hitting. republicans have been promising for years now that if you are 55 you will not have to worry about these medicare changes. now the moderates do seem to be on board on the gop conference. host: on the senate side, "the washington times closed what reporting this morning -- it is winning support from other republicans like senator mark o. rubio from florida. talk about that. guest: the senate budget is a little bit more notable in the sense that since 2009 the senate democrats passed the budget. this is going to be a significant political test for them. the senate makes the process more difficult for the democrats over there in the budget speech. they have only a -- they cannot lose a single vote or else the vote would be deadlocked 11-11. patty murray, the chairwoman, has to appease the independent from vermont who causes of the socialist and centrist like mark warner. it is very difficult and they are having trouble over there. the next thing that happens f
archbishop of buenos aires was elected by the cardinals yesterday in a strong religion of changing die nam milks. he was selected on the fifth round of voting. at the secret conclave. his name announced for a crowd of over a hundred thousand people gathered in st. peters square. that was quite a sight, mike barnicle, to watch unfold. >> the theater, the theater of the church is unmatched, unparalleled when you consider the ramifications of what we all watched yesterday. hundreds of thousands of people in st. peters square and millions around the world watching this. everything in doubt until those doors opened. the theater of black smoke and white smoke. there was no red state, blue state, no chuck todd standing in front of a map announcing winners. >> not that we don't love that. >> i know, i know. >> it's all go. >> not that there is anything wrong with that. >> until that door opened, we did not know who the next pope would be and the significance of the choice is overwhelming as well. the pope crosses the ocean to latin america. first time it's happened as you pointed out, joe. >> righ
sinced i have seen -- 1988. i have seen it three or four times change. why do they put any president in and they keep changing it? now, they put obama in their -- there. ,ou say it is not a racial call but it looks everything base -- that he says, they knock him down area an. we old people deserve to have -- proper medical care. you have other colors. host: this is a statement by the chairman of the policy committee -- host: back to the phones, rick in massachusetts is on our line for independents. go ahead. caller: good morning, everyone. i am in the upper middle income bracket and i support the health care law. until we get to the point where hospitals refuse people with no insurance, we have to make sure that people that can pay for it , pay for it. am a bit disgusted that the largest group against it are that are on medicare. as people know, that is the program that has to be reformed. that is going to cause the country to go broke in the future. if people can look it is rationally, this is what we have to do. thank you. host: we are continuing the conversation on twitter. we hav
. >> thank you. >> brown: now to the conflict in syria and a change in the united states' role. ray suarez explains. >> the united states has decided that given the stakes the president will now extend food and medical supplies to the opposition including to the syrian opposition's supreme military council. so there will be direct assistance, though non-lethal. >> suarez: word of the shift in u.s. policy came from secretary of state john kerry in rome. the upshot: for the first time, humanitarian aid will be directly channeled to armed syrian rebel groups. the initial installment: $60 million. >> this funding will allow the opposition to reach out and help the local councils to be able to rebuild in their liberated areas of syria, so that they can provide basic services to people who often lack access today to medical care, to food, to sanitation. >> suarez: additional pledges are expected from ten other european and arab nations attending the rome gathering. but after two years of war in syria and more than 70,000 dead what the rebels most want are guns. so far, the united states has refu
to as the revolution of 1800, because it was such a dramatic change in the other party coming in. he did not attend the in migration. some thought he was being spiteful. he had to catch an early stage to get back. part of it was a man who, in a sense, he felt the trade him and defeated him. i think that was probably the hardest thing to get. >> the couple that's been so many years apart and the development of their country and now had this opportunity to live together, how long did they live together in the white house years? >> abigail lived to 1818. he lived together for 18 years. >> how was it for them? >> they were idyllic for them and very difficult in some ways. abigail refused to visit her daughter because she said i can't leave john. during that time, her daughter had a mastectomy in 1811 without anesthesia. >> that is so hard to think of. >> she ultimately died two years later. it was a time of satisfaction and peace and also very great disruptions in their lives. they had problems with grandchildren and children and constant drama going on. one grandson went and fought in the revolution i
're taking corporate contributions. that's a big change. >> why are they doing this? why would the president -- it just seems like he's making his life more complicated politically. why would he do this? >> i think they want to take the strength of their grassroots operation, their access to money, and try to marry them up so he can succeed in the midterms. so he can do in the last two years of his second term what he did in the first two years of his first term. they think the only way to do that is fight the chamber of commerce, fight corporate money. >> i'm not shocked by it. it's just pretty -- not shocked by the practice because it's how washington's run forever. i'm just very surprised, as you pointed out. even taking corporate money to do this. we're a long, long way -- >> okay. i want to get to the thriller in bloomberg. that doesn't work. last night in his debate with "new york times" columnist, joe raised some concerns about spending and long-term debt, particularly with an ageing population, reaching retirement age. take a look. >> we should have used the '90s. we should have used
to think that's going to change anytime soon. but i am on the lookout for something that comes along to disturb that pretty comfortable view right now. >> yeah. it's interesting, rick santelli, because we keep hearing all this talk about the great rotation, money coming out of fixed income, out of bonds, and into stocks. and so far, anybody you talk to keeps saying, who's buying? well, this newfound buying and this new momentum that we saw in 2013 is all from cash. 4 401ks, it's not coming out of bonds. >> end it so interesting that in the eight days, starting on the 28th of february, that brought us to this record, in those eight days, the range of closing yields is about 20 basis points. so the surreal effect of what's going on, not to dismiss it, but it really is surreal. i mean, as a fixed income guy, with which great run, i would have suspected interest rates to be much higher. so we do get back to the fed. i always find it fascinating that the people really talking about this great rotation, like stocks, don't want to acknowledge so much that the fed's at the epicenter. but it
to cut spending. i am thinking of changing my name to cut spending. host: here is what steve wrote on twitter -- let's hear from dennis in massachusetts, independent. caller: how are you? i am reacting to the report that the senate plan suggests another quarter billion dollar cut to medicare after the $760 billion cut that the senate democrats have already made. as your reporter just said, but guess you havd, it's doubtful that will not affect medicare beneficiaries. i am a medicare beneficiary and among the democratic party voucher plan, which has been very successful. to the extent they can customs fraud and waste, they ought to be a bad back to the medicare trust fund and not use it for other things. host: let's look at some details. years the distance between party budgets as laid out by the new york times. you can see what senate democrats have on the table. $5.20 trillion in deficits over 10 years. you can see the projected deficits and how they would tackle that. and in the house republican version, $1.20 trillion in deficits over 10 years, a bigger goal of reducing the defi
finished the commission report that recommend to congress that they change that law now retirees can have their benefits cut if this goes through congress, so i think everybody needs to start making some phone calls. host: all right our last phone call. up next we will talk to congressman steve pearce about his outreach to minorities, women and young voters and then we will turn our attention to capitol hill with earl. we'll be right back. >> 34 years ago fay we began providing access to the kong and federal government. the c-span networks created by america's cable companies in 1979 and brought to you as a public service by your cable providers. >> and we can take pictures with m.r.i. or upset scans or c.t. scans and see the whole thing but there's an enormous gap about how the circuits function in the brain as to how i am able to move my hand or to lay down a memory. we don't know how that works. with technology yet to be invented, so a lot of this is going to be technology invented or nano technology. but we need to be able to record hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the same tim
they are right. in the think anything lives of average people is changing. i am sick and tired of them laughing and clapping. it is so artificial. the rich people, corporations, thereby and selling from each other to increase the value of wall street. they succeeded. as far as we are concerned, average people, we cannot afford to do anything. we cannot even buy food. the food prices are foodup. you cannot buy a pound of ground beef for $5. who can afford to feed their kids? [woman laughing] i am really mad. host: are you speaking from personal experience? caller: yes. i am one of those persons who never misses the news. i read newspapers. i watched c-span all the time. mrs. obama is suggesting people go and eat fresh fruits and vegetables. how can we afford to buy an orange for dollar? an orae has been a dollar for fi years. you cannot afford to buy apples or is ke. wall street numbers going up -- it does not mean anything. host: here's the "usa today money section -- troy in west babylon, new york, a democrat. caller: you have a pretty smile. i will give you some solutions i have heard on c-sp
the defendant with hundreds of questions about her boyfriend's murder including why her version of event changed three times and why she can't remember some of the most gruesome details. >> how can you say you don't have memory issues when you can't remember how you stabbed him so many times and slashed his throat? >> well, i think that i have a good memory. june 4 is an anomaly for me. i don't think that i have memory issues that are any different from another average person. >> arizona is one of just three states that allows jurors to question witnesses at a criminal trial. >>> several florida beaches are open this morning after thousands of sharks prompted life guards to close them. the sharks are migrating up the coast as the water with starts to warm for the summer. this happens every year which is scary to think about. deerfield beach was one of the cled shorelines because of the shark sightings. >>> another close encounter today. scientists say another asteroid, this one the size of a football field, will whiz past earth this happening. this is happening just days after a smaller rock mad
, but it changes the definition of what it means to be a friend. and that, it seems to me what supporters of proposition 8 are saying here. all you're interested in is the label and you insist on changing the definition of the label. >> that is the voice of chief justice john roberts there. >> if you're over the age of 55, you don't help us serve the government's interest and regulate through marriage so why is that different? >> your honor, even with respect to couples over the age of 55, it is very rare that both parties to the couple are infertile and the traditional. >> no, because if a couple -- i can just assure you if both the woman and the man are over the age of 55, there are not a lot of children coming out of that marriage. >> that's elena kagan right there. jonathan capehart, how old were you? seriously? >> no. move on. >> no. this is good. this is a fair question. >> not over 50. >> jonathan, let's start our conversation with you. it's always a treat to listen into the supreme court. we don't get to hear that very often. what did you take away from what you heard yesterday? >
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